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Mrs Menon’s mango curry

Mrs. Menon is an old family friend of Darren’s. During the yearly Malayali festival of Onam, Mrs Menon would often have Darren’s family over for a Sadhya, and this mango curry is a common feature. This curry has been on Dewakan’s menu in various forms for almost four years before it was retired last year, though it remains one of his favourite curries. The sweet taste of the mangoes is tempered by the bloomed spices, and makes for a delicate and balanced accompaniment to ponni rice.

Mrs Menon’s mango curry

by Darren Teoh

Mrs. Menon is an old family friend of Darren’s. During the yearly Malayali festival of Onam, Mrs Menon would often have Darren’s family over for a Sadhya, and this mango curry is a common feature. This curry has been on Dewakan’s menu in various forms for almost four years before it was retired last year, though it remains one of his favourite curries. The sweet taste of the mangoes is tempered by the bloomed spices, and makes for a delicate and balanced accompaniment to ponni rice.

Servings: 4

Prep time: Quick

Servings: 4

Prep time: Quick

FOR THE CURRY:

2 tbps coconut oil

6-7 shallots, peeled and thinly sliced

4 green chillies, deseeded and thinly sliced

30g ginger, finely chopped

½ sprig curry leaves, removed from the stalk, divided

1 tsp cumin seed, pounded

4 mangoes, peeled and diced (seed removed)

400g water (depending on the mango’s flavour and ripeness)

100g coconut milk, first press

150g tamarind juice

Salt to taste

 

FOR TEMPERING:

2 tbsp coconut oil

½ sprig curry leaves

2 dried chillies, halved crosswise

1 tsp mustard seed

  1. Place a medium saucepan on medium heat. Pour in the coconut oil, and once the oil begins to shimmer, add the shallots, green chilli, and ginger. Fry until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes.
  2. Add in half of the curry leaves and all of the pounded cumin. Stir well. Fry the mixture for about 3-5 minutes until the shallots begin to soften.
  3. Add the diced mangoes to the pot and stir well. Cook until the mangoes break down completely, about 10-15 minutes. If the mangoes start to stick to the bottom of the pot, add enough water to just cover the mangoes.
  4. Pour in the coconut milk and tamarind juice, then adjust to taste. It should be slightly tangy from the mango and tamarind, and creamy from the coconut milk.
  5. Season the curry with salt, a small pinch at a time. Taste the curry between additions of salt until it is balanced enough to your liking.
  6. Turn off the flame and remove the saucepan from the heat. It should be saucy but not too pulpy. The consistency of the curry can be adjusted with water, tamarind juice, or coconut milk, depending on what it needs.
  7. In a separate pan over medium heat, pour in another 2 tbsp of coconut oil. Once the oil begins to shimmer, add the dried chillies, mustard seeds, and curry leaves. When the mustard seeds begin to pop, turn off the heat and pour the tempered spices along with the oil over the mango curry.
  8. Serve the curry hot with parboiled rice and the rest of the Sadhya if you have it.

Tips

  • Get the freshest mangoes available to you. Local mangoes are usually sweet-sour, and work best for this curry. The ultra-sweet mangoes are not quite suitable.

Ingredients

FOR THE CURRY:

2 tbps coconut oil

6-7 shallots, peeled and thinly sliced

4 green chillies, deseeded and thinly sliced

30g ginger, finely chopped

½ sprig curry leaves, removed from the stalk, divided

1 tsp cumin seed, pounded

4 mangoes, peeled and diced (seed removed)

400g water (depending on the mango’s flavour and ripeness)

100g coconut milk, first press

150g tamarind juice

Salt to taste

 

FOR TEMPERING:

2 tbsp coconut oil

½ sprig curry leaves

2 dried chillies, halved crosswise

1 tsp mustard seed

Directions

  1. Place a medium saucepan on medium heat. Pour in the coconut oil, and once the oil begins to shimmer, add the shallots, green chilli, and ginger. Fry until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes.
  2. Add in half of the curry leaves and all of the pounded cumin. Stir well. Fry the mixture for about 3-5 minutes until the shallots begin to soften.
  3. Add the diced mangoes to the pot and stir well. Cook until the mangoes break down completely, about 10-15 minutes. If the mangoes start to stick to the bottom of the pot, add enough water to just cover the mangoes.
  4. Pour in the coconut milk and tamarind juice, then adjust to taste. It should be slightly tangy from the mango and tamarind, and creamy from the coconut milk.
  5. Season the curry with salt, a small pinch at a time. Taste the curry between additions of salt until it is balanced enough to your liking.
  6. Turn off the flame and remove the saucepan from the heat. It should be saucy but not too pulpy. The consistency of the curry can be adjusted with water, tamarind juice, or coconut milk, depending on what it needs.
  7. In a separate pan over medium heat, pour in another 2 tbsp of coconut oil. Once the oil begins to shimmer, add the dried chillies, mustard seeds, and curry leaves. When the mustard seeds begin to pop, turn off the heat and pour the tempered spices along with the oil over the mango curry.
  8. Serve the curry hot with parboiled rice and the rest of the Sadhya if you have it.

Tips

  • Get the freshest mangoes available to you. Local mangoes are usually sweet-sour, and work best for this curry. The ultra-sweet mangoes are not quite suitable.

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© Copyright Periuk 2021

© Copyright Periuk 2021