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Tapioca sambal tumis

This is a breakfast and tea time staple on the dining tables of Alia’s extended Johorean family. Her late grandmother was a genius at using different starches to create different dishes, and this is no exception. Using fried rice tumis as a base, she used tapioca to soak up the aromatics and deeply flavour the tubers.

 

Tableware by Ilham Ceramic Studio.

Tapioca sambal tumis

by Alia Ali
Alia Ali

This is a breakfast and tea time staple on the dining tables of Alia’s extended Johorean family. Her late grandmother was a genius at using different starches to create different dishes, and this is no exception. Using fried rice tumis as a base, she used tapioca to soak up the aromatics and deeply flavour the tubers.

 

Tableware by Ilham Ceramic Studio.

Servings: 4

Prep time: Quick

Servings: 4

Prep time: Quick

1kg tapioca, peeled and cleaned

6 shallots, peeled

4 cloves garlic, peeled

2 fresh red chillies

1 handful ikan bilis, cleaned

2 tbsp vegetable oil

500ml water, plus more as needed

  1. Slice the tapioca into wedges or the size of British chips, about 2″ long.
  2. Pound or process the shallots, garlic, chillies, and ikan bilis with a pestle and mortar or a food processor until it becomes a chunky paste.
  3. Place a wok over medium flame. Once it heats up, pour in the vegetable oil. When the oil begins to shimmer, add in the processed shallot paste. Fry for about 3-5 minutes until it begins to darken slightly in colour.
  4. Add the tapioca wedges into the wok along with the water. Stir very well, then cover the wok with a lid. Turn the heat down to low.
  5. Check on the tapioca every 5 minutes and stir to make sure the bottom does not burn or stick to the wok. After about 15 minutes, check one of the larger wedges to see if the tapioca has cooked by slicing through it. It does not have to turn translucent all the way through, as long as it is soft and has lost its raw taste. If it is not cooked yet, add about 100-200ml of water and continue cooking with the lid on, stirring every 5 minutes.
  6. The tapioca should take a total of 20-25 minutes to cook. Serve warm.

Ingredients

1kg tapioca, peeled and cleaned

6 shallots, peeled

4 cloves garlic, peeled

2 fresh red chillies

1 handful ikan bilis, cleaned

2 tbsp vegetable oil

500ml water, plus more as needed

Directions

  1. Slice the tapioca into wedges or the size of British chips, about 2″ long.
  2. Pound or process the shallots, garlic, chillies, and ikan bilis with a pestle and mortar or a food processor until it becomes a chunky paste.
  3. Place a wok over medium flame. Once it heats up, pour in the vegetable oil. When the oil begins to shimmer, add in the processed shallot paste. Fry for about 3-5 minutes until it begins to darken slightly in colour.
  4. Add the tapioca wedges into the wok along with the water. Stir very well, then cover the wok with a lid. Turn the heat down to low.
  5. Check on the tapioca every 5 minutes and stir to make sure the bottom does not burn or stick to the wok. After about 15 minutes, check one of the larger wedges to see if the tapioca has cooked by slicing through it. It does not have to turn translucent all the way through, as long as it is soft and has lost its raw taste. If it is not cooked yet, add about 100-200ml of water and continue cooking with the lid on, stirring every 5 minutes.
  6. The tapioca should take a total of 20-25 minutes to cook. Serve warm.

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© Copyright Periuk 2021

© Copyright Periuk 2021