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Tau eu bah

Brought to Southeast Asia from the Fujian Province in Southern China, this comforting braise gradually adapted to local tastes around the region. Grandma Ong incorporates spices not found in the original version, bringing a Nyonya punch to this crowd favourite. 

Tau eu bah

by Grandma Ong

Brought to Southeast Asia from the Fujian Province in Southern China, this comforting braise gradually adapted to local tastes around the region. Grandma Ong incorporates spices not found in the original version, bringing a Nyonya punch to this crowd favourite. 

Servings: 4

Servings: 4

2-3 slices of ginger

500g pork belly, cut in 1” chunks

2 tbsp vegetable oil

2 tbsp kecap manis

2 tbsp dark soy sauce

2 tbsp light soy sauce

1 tsp tamari (optional)

2 dried chillies (optional)

1.5l water

1 head of garlic

1 pod star anise

1/2 stick cinnamon

White pepper to taste

5 whole hard-boiled eggs, peeled

  1. Bring a saucepan of water with 2-3 slices of ginger to a boil. Add the meat, then remove once the water comes up to a boil again. This is done to remove any unpleasant odours from the meat.
  2. Heat up a large pot over a medium flame. Once the pot is hot, add 2 tbsp of vegetable oil. When the oil begins to shimmer, add the parboiled pork belly pieces and various soy sauces and kecap manis. Stir fry for about 5 minutes, until meat is evenly coated and browned slightly. If using chillies, add them to the pot now.
  3. Pour enough water into the pot to cover the meat. Smash the whole head of garlic with the flat of a knife, and add it to the pot along with the star anise, cinnamon, white pepper, and hard-boiled eggs.
  4. Bring the pot to a simmer, then reduce the heat to very low and cover the pan. Simmer for about an hour until the meat is tender, stirring occasionally. If the sauce is drying out too much, add water as necessary.
  5. Once the meat is tender, finish the dish with more white pepper and serve with rice. 

Tips

  • Adjust seasoning to taste: Light soy adds saltiness, while dark soy and tamari add depth of flavour and umami. The sugar content in kecap manis aids in the caramelisation of the meat.
  • This recipe keeps well in the fridge for a couple of days, with the eggs absorbing more sauce and flavour over time. If left in the sauce, the chilli and star anise will continue to add heat and flavour.
  • To reheat, slowly bring to a gentle simmer, adding a splash of water if necessary. 

Ingredients

2-3 slices of ginger

500g pork belly, cut in 1” chunks

2 tbsp vegetable oil

2 tbsp kecap manis

2 tbsp dark soy sauce

2 tbsp light soy sauce

1 tsp tamari (optional)

2 dried chillies (optional)

1.5l water

1 head of garlic

1 pod star anise

1/2 stick cinnamon

White pepper to taste

5 whole hard-boiled eggs, peeled

Directions

  1. Bring a saucepan of water with 2-3 slices of ginger to a boil. Add the meat, then remove once the water comes up to a boil again. This is done to remove any unpleasant odours from the meat.
  2. Heat up a large pot over a medium flame. Once the pot is hot, add 2 tbsp of vegetable oil. When the oil begins to shimmer, add the parboiled pork belly pieces and various soy sauces and kecap manis. Stir fry for about 5 minutes, until meat is evenly coated and browned slightly. If using chillies, add them to the pot now.
  3. Pour enough water into the pot to cover the meat. Smash the whole head of garlic with the flat of a knife, and add it to the pot along with the star anise, cinnamon, white pepper, and hard-boiled eggs.
  4. Bring the pot to a simmer, then reduce the heat to very low and cover the pan. Simmer for about an hour until the meat is tender, stirring occasionally. If the sauce is drying out too much, add water as necessary.
  5. Once the meat is tender, finish the dish with more white pepper and serve with rice. 

Tips

  • Adjust seasoning to taste: Light soy adds saltiness, while dark soy and tamari add depth of flavour and umami. The sugar content in kecap manis aids in the caramelisation of the meat.
  • This recipe keeps well in the fridge for a couple of days, with the eggs absorbing more sauce and flavour over time. If left in the sauce, the chilli and star anise will continue to add heat and flavour.
  • To reheat, slowly bring to a gentle simmer, adding a splash of water if necessary. 
 
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© Copyright Periuk 2021

© Copyright Periuk 2021